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Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on EX-Series Switches

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Article ID: KB10868 KB Last Updated: 07 Oct 2008Version: 5.0
Summary:
When defining an interface, you specify the interface type, the FPC slot in which the Physical Interface Module (PIM) is installed, the PIC within the FPC, and the port on that PIC. A hyphen (-) separates the interface type from the slot number, and a slash (/) separates the slot number, PIC number, and port numbers.
Solution:

Physical Part of an Interface Name

When you define an interface, you specify the interface type, the FPC slot in which the Physical Interface Module (PIM) is installed, the PIC within the FPC, and the port on that PIC. A hyphen (-) separates the interface type from the slot number, and a slash (/) separates the slot number, PIC number, and port numbers:

type-slot/pic/port

The EX-series switches apply this convention as follows:

  • interface type: EX-series interfaces use the following media types:
  • ge - Gigabit Ethernet interface
  • xe - 10 Gigabit ports (these are the ports on the EX-UM-2XFP uplink module)
  • slot number/member-id: 0

    EX 3200 switches have only one slot for the network ports. It is slot number 0.

    An individual, standalone EX 4200 switch has only one slot number. It is slot number 0.

    If an EX 4200 switch is interconnected with other switches in a virtual chassis, the master switch assigns it a member id. The member id functions as a slot number. When you are configuring interfaces for a virtual chassis, you specify the appropriate member id 0 through 9.

  • PIC number: 0 or 1

    Use the number 0 to specify the PIC for any network port on the switch itself.

    If you are configuring a port on an uplink module, use the number 1 as the PIC.

  • port number: This is the number of the port. The network ports are on the front panel of the switch and are labeled from left to right starting with 0 followed by the remaining even numbered ports in the top row and 1 followed by the remaining odd number ports in the bottom row. (On the partial PoE switches, port numbers 0 through 7 have a label that is a different color from the labels on the remaining ports to indicate that these first eight ports are PoE ports.)

Figure 1   Network Ports on the 24–Port Ex-series Switch

Image g020054.gif


Figure 2   Network Ports on the 48–Port EX-series Switch

Image g020081.gif


Logical Part of an Interface Name

The logical unit part of the interface name corresponds to the logical unit number, which can be a number from 0 through 16384. In the virtual part of the name, a period (.) separates the port and logical unit numbers: media-type-fpc/pic/port.logical. For example, if you issue the show ethernet-switching interfaces command on a system with a default VLAN, the resulting display shows the logical interfaces associated with the VLAN:

		ge-0/0/1.0 69 v1
ge-0/0/2.0 70
ge-0/0/3.0 71

When you configure aggregated Ethernet interfaces, you configure a logical interface that is called a bundle or a LAG. Each LAG can include up to 8 Ethernet interfaces.


Wildcard Characters in Interface Names

In the show interfaces and clear interfaces commands, you can use wildcard characters in the interface-name option to specify groups of interface names without having to type each name individually. You must enclose all wildcard characters except the asterisk (*) in quotation marks (“ ”).

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